The Square Shape in the Family Puzzle

First, I need you to take a test. Draw one of these shapes (you can even do it in the air), but it helps to draw it. Draw a circle, square, triangle or squiggle? If you’re thinking, ‘A squiggle is NOT a shape!’ just draw a different shape. Since you 'know' squiggle is not a shape, you may be a square!

If you are a SQUARE keep reading! (Check these blogs for the Circle, Triangle and Squiggle shapes.)


Square shape in the family

Squares* are hard workers and will get the job done, no matter how long it takes. Organization is like a religion to them. They need structure and life needs to be predictable, so they tend to organize the people and things around them. They are left-brain orientated; collect factual data and are very analytical. Squares are not strong decision makers (analyzing all options) and don’t like to take risk.

Squares are dependable workers and people turn to them to get the job done. Given rules, clear instructions, set deadlines and the right tools – the squares with excel above all other shapes! But don’t put them in a state of flux! Once they are committed to a line of action they are resistant to change. Squares are not team players. They can be make strong administrators because they can be compulsive to detail. They can follow a plan, but not design the plan.


Squares like routine (getting up and going to bed at the same time every day), love things in writing, are prompt, precise and need to ‘see it’ to believe it. They are neat (items in the exact spot inside of the drawer), no foreign objects in their car and nothing is done without planning it out first! Socially they prefer to do things alone, or in small groups.

* This is based on Communicating Beyond our Differences by Susan Dellinger. (Not all the descriptions will apply to every square, but if the majority do, then the square is your correct personality shape.)

If you live with a square you are lucky. They are honest, organized and literal encyclopedias of information. The downside, they are perfectionist, stubborn, overly serious and procrastinators. To live in peace, treat your square with respect and patience.

The square child will excel in school academically. But will need to work on developing socially. Encourage team sports and push them to have a variety of friends and not just other squares. Watch their compulsive behavior, once they start it will be hard for them to switch directions. They will do what you do, not what you say! Allow them to make mistakes and take risks. Don’t reinforce their perfectionism behavior.

Keys to raising a child that is a square:

1. Set rules and routines – be consistent

2. Communicate clearly – give immediate feedback

3. Encourage the child to explore and make mistakes without recrimination

4. Always give reasons for decisions

5. Set the example you want the child to follow

#PersonalityTypes #SchoolAgeKids #TrueSelfu’re thinking, ‘A squiggle is NOT a shape!’ just draw a different shape. Since you 'know' squiggle is not a shape, you may be a square!

Today's post will focus on the SQUARES! (Here are the links to check out the Circles, Triangles and Squiggles.)


Squares* are hard workers and will get the job done, no matter how long it takes. Organization is like a religion to them. They need structure and life needs to be predictable, so they tend to organize the people and things around them. They are left-brain orientated; collect factual data and are very analytical. Squares are not strong decision makers (analyzing all options) and don’t like to take risk.

Squares are dependable workers and people turn to them to get the job done. Given rules, clear instructions, set deadlines and the right tools – the squares with excel above all other shapes! But don’t put them in a state of flux! Once they are committed to a line of action they are resistant to change. Squares are not team players. They can be make strong administrators because they can be compulsive to detail.


They can follow a plan, but not design the plan.

Squares like routine (getting up and going to bed at the same time every day), love things in writing, are prompt, precise and need to ‘see it’ to believe it. They are neat (items in the exact spot inside of the drawer), no foreign objects in their car and nothing is done without planning it out first! Socially they prefer to do things alone, or in small groups.


If you live with a square you are lucky. They are honest, organized and literal encyclopedias of information. The downside, they are perfectionist, stubborn, overly serious and procrastinators. To live in peace, treat your square with respect and patience.


The square child will excel in school academically. But will need to work on developing socially. Encourage team sports and push them to have a variety of friends and not just other squares. Watch their compulsive behavior, once they start it will be hard for them to switch directions. They will do what you do, not what you say! Allow them to make mistakes and take risks. Don’t reinforce their perfectionism behavior. *


Keys to raising a child that is a square:

  1. Set rules and routines – be consistent

  2. Communicate clearly – give immediate feedback

  3. Encourage the child to explore and make mistakes without recrimination

  4. Always give reasons for decisions

  5. Set the example you want the child to follow

*This is based on Communicating Beyond our Differences by Susan Dellinger. (Not all the descriptions will apply to every square, but if the majority do, then the square is your correct personality shape.)

#PersonalityShapes #AboutMyTrueSelf

Contact

Lori Koch, Founding Mom,

based in the Minneapolis, MN area.

952-469-9465

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